Thursday, August 30, 2012

See Jane Eat Drink Read Write




Last weekend I rededicated myself to a promise I made years ago. 

No, I didn’t renew my wedding vows.  I decided to renew my efforts to fall in love with the city of Birmingham. I spent last Friday night and Saturday and Sunday afternoons at the Sidewalk Film Festival, an annual independent film festival held in various venues of downtown Birmingham. (I wrote stories on the film Our Mockingbird and the short documentaries produced by University of Alabama at Birmingham students for Magic City Post.) I had a blast and the weekend made me realize that Birmingham really can make me happy if I give her a chance.

So, this fall I plan to attend as many events as I can. Just around the corner is the Birmingham Public Library’s second Eat Drink Read Write Festival, which is set for Sept. 8 - 15, 2012. The Birmingham Public Library has joined forces with several Birmingham food organizations to present this year’s event. Presentations will include good food and good conversation from national and local food and beer experts. All events are free and will feature food tastings, a cooking class, a food documentary and more. Events will be held at the downtown public library, Pepper Place and the Desert Island Supply Co. in Woodlawn.
I would love for some of the ladies of See Jane Write to join me at some of the Eat Drink Read Write Festival events such as Food Stories, set for Wednesday, Sept. 12 at the Desert Island Supply Co., 5500 First Ave. North. For this event participants will have five minutes to tell a true, personal story about food. No notes allowed. This presentation is modeled after National Public Radio's "The Moth: True Stories Told Live.'' Birmingham Originals member restaurants will provide refreshments. Reservations are required so visit http://foodstories2012.eventbrite.com/ to register today. Then RSVP at the See Jane Write Facebook group page to let me know you're coming. 

And please join me Friday, Sept. 14 at Bards & Brews. It's really a shame that I have yet to attend the library's popular poetry performance and beer-tasting event. On this night, Chef Corey Hinkel of MIX Bakery and Cafe will discuss beer and cheese pairings. Chef Chris Dupont of MIX Bakery and Cafe and Cafe Dupont will prepare appetizers, using ingredients donated by Whole Foods Market. There will also be a poetry slam and prizes to the top three winners. Avondale Brewing Co., Back Forty Beer Co., Bell's Brewery and Good People Brewing Co. will furnish the beer. The Reflections, a band made up of library employees, is also set to perform.

Reservations are not required for this event, but please RSVP at the See Jane Write Facebook group page to let me know you're coming so I'll keep an eye out for you. 

Click here for a complete list of events.  

See Jane Co-Write



When Texas socialite Joanne King Herring, the woman portrayed by Julia Roberts in the movie Charlie Wilson’s War, wanted help writing her memoir she didn’t choose a big shot author from the New York Times best seller list. No, it was Birmingham’s own Nancy Dorman-Hickson who was selected for the job, thanks to her Southern roots and her ability to find common ground with people.

The importance of being able to relate well to others was just one of the many tips Dorman-Hickson offered Tuesday evening during her presentation “A Ghost Story: My Life as a Co-Writer and Print/Web Writer.”

At this event, hosted by See Jane Write Birmingham, Dorman-Hickson discussed ghostwriting and collaborative writing, freelance writing, and personal branding to a crowd of 30 local writers.




Is co-writing for you?

The primary difference between ghostwriting and co-writing is with ghostwriting you won’t receive any credit for helping with the book. Your name won’t appear on the cover and you’ll even have to sign a contract stating that you won’t reveal your connection to the project. With co-writing, you will receive credit, but it’s still important to check your ego at the door. As Dorman-Hickson explained when recounting her experience with Herring, the person you’re working with gets the final word when making creative decisions.

With co-writing, you may be paid a flat or hourly rate. Dorman-Hickson said that on average the hourly rate is about $73 per hour. Flat rates run the gamut and can range from $6,000 to $150,000, but typically average at about $22,000.

To be a successful co-writer you need much more than good writing skills. This is a job that will call for you to be an editor and to manage people.

If you think co-writing is for you, one of the best ways to land co-writing gigs is by networking with other co-writers. You should also place a profile on PublishersMarketplace.com, Dorman-Hickson recommended. And don't be afraid to approach prominent people and offer to help them tell their story.

The Truth About Freelancing

During her talk, Dorman-Hickson was very honest about the realities of freelancing. It is nearly impossible to survive as a full-time freelancer these days because most publications pay writers such meager fees. But don't be discouraged. Learn to maximize each assignment you get and also think outside the box. Market your writing services to companies that haven't been hit as hard by the economic downturn.

 

Buidling Your Brand
Dorman-Hickson also discussed personal branding because whether you want to admit it or not, to be a successful writer, you have to build a successful brand for yourself. This may sound like a daunting task, but it can be easier than you think. A few things you'll need: business cards, a website and/or blog, and an e-newsletter.
You can even use your email signature and your voicemail greeting as promotion tools.
Give presentations to writing groups and book clubs.
And work on your elevator speech. Be sure that you can give a short, yet captivating description of what you do at a moment's notice.
One of the things from Dorman-Hickson's talk that stood out to me most is the idea that one of the best ways to help your writing career is to help other writers with their careers. That's exactly what I strive to do with See Jane Write. It's nice to know I'm on the right track.
 

Scenes from the See Jane Write August Event














 
Cross-posted at WriteousBabe.com.




Monday, August 13, 2012

See Jane Write presents A Ghost Story


Are you looking for new ways to earn money as a writer? 

If so, you need to mark your calendar for the next See Jane Write event, set for Tuesday, Aug. 28 at 5:30 p.m. at Matthew's Bar & Grill


Author and freelance writer Nancy Dorman-Hickson will present "A Ghost Story: My Life as a Co-Writer and Print/Web Writer."  She'll include fun experiences she's had as a writer such as the strangest places she's taken her laptop or conducted an interview; techniques for capturing a personality; and the ego-boosting (and ego-crushing) acts of creating personal bios and author photos and participating in book signings. 

Before freelancing, Dorman-Hickson was an editor for Southern Living and Progressive Farmer magazines during which time she received praise for her writing from Harper Lee, Pat Conroy, Naomi Judd, Fannie Flagg and many more. She is the ghostwriter of a book on family violence and the co-author of Diplomacy and Diamonds, the best-selling memoir of Texas socialite Joanne King Herring, who was portrayed by Julia Roberts in the movie Charlie Wilson’s War. You can learn more about  at Dorman-Hickson at www.NancyDormanHickson.com.

Ghostwriting may be something you've never considered because there's no fame or glory in this line of work. "In fact," Dorman-Hickson said, "ghostwriters sign contracts agreeing not to tell anyone that they worked on the book at all, thus the term 'ghost.'"

So why would anyone want to be a ghostwriter? For the money, honey! 

"It can be a lucrative field," Dorman-Hickson said. "The figures are all over the board. I've heard everything from $2,500 to $100,000, but those high-figures come about only after a writer has deep experience and a lot of luck."

Still, if ghostwriting is completely out of the question for you, there's always collaborative writing, such as Dorman-Hickson's project with Joanne King Herring. On the cover of that memoir you'll also find Dorman-Hickson's name. 

"It can mean good money in a time when writers are having a hard time getting assignments and being paid adequately for their work," Dorman-Hickson said. "Also it is fulfilling to complete a book, especially when it bears your name."

For those wondering if ghostwriting or collaborative writing is for you, Dorman-Hickson said, "If you are a writer who enjoys knowing what you're going to be writing and what you're going to be working on for a long period of time, book-length projects are ideal. They provide security in the topsyturvy world of freelancing. You use the same skills you use with other types of writing. You just use them for a longer period of time focusing on the same subject."

Dorman-Hickson will have copies of Diplomacy and Diamonds for sale (cash or check only) for $25 at the event. 

In addition to information on ghostwriting and collaborative writing, Dorman-Hickson will also discuss how to freelance for magazines, websites and other publications and how to build your brand as a writer.


See Jane Write August Event 
What: Nancy Dorman Hickson presents A Ghost Story: My Life as a Co-Writer and Print/Web Writer
When: Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 p.m.
Where: Matthew's Bar & Grill, 2208 Morris Avenue, Birmingham, AL 35203

This event is free, but registration is required. Register by visiting aghoststory.eventbrite.com
Special thanks to our venue sponsor Matthew's Bar & Grill. Please support Matthew's by purchasing food and/or drinks at this event.